Interviewing your interviewer.


You’ve been invited to interview; you do your research, you visit the company website and you look at the team on LinkedIn in preparation. You’ve read the job description and you’ve prepared your own examples of relevant experience to talk about. You get a good night’s sleep and ensure you leave the house with plenty of time. You arrive no longer than 10 minutes early and greet the receptionist politely and enthusiastically.

You’ve got through various steps of the interview already; you recognised the interviewer from LinkedIn as they approached you, and you stand up to give them a firm handshake. You’ve laid your CV out in front of you to refer to, to ensure accuracy and maybe help to prompt you. You’re asked what you know about the brand and you answer confidently to show your interest.

30minutes – 1 hr later.

You’ve been interviewed; and you’ve given it your all. But before you’re excused, you’re asked one final question and with it you’re provided with an opportunity to do the exact same thing yourself. You are about to interview your interviewer.

“Do you have any questions for me?”

The answer to this question should always be yes as you would have prepared these already; you were anticipating this and you know how important it is to:

  • Show your enthusiasm for the role
  • Demonstrate confidence and self-awareness
  • Envision yourself in the role  

Some examples of these questions may include some of the below, but the sole purpose of these questions should not be information gathering, they should be carefully thought out to leverage your strengths for the position and to impress the employer.

  1. If I was successful, how could I exceed expectations during my first three months?
  2. How do you measure success?
  3. Tell me about your current top performer and what you think they do differently to the rest.
  4. How will my role contribute to other areas of the business? OR any longer-term goals you might have?

The most important thing is that you prepare questions that provokes your interviewer to foresee your success in the role and allows you to finish the interview in a positive manner. I sometimes read articles which suggest you ask questions around the concerns of the employer, in order to alleviate them. Whilst I don’t doubt this would provide you with a good opportunity to try and do so, it does leave you vulnerable and if discussed during the final few minutes of the interview, it could be one of the last things the employer remembers about you. Use this opportunity to demonstrate confidence in your own ability, share final success stories and ultimately, to impress the employer.

If you are looking for a new job within the property and construction sectors, get in touch with GKR today. We recruit for both permanent and interim opportunities ranging from trainee up to Senior Director and Board Level opportunities across all aspects of the property market. We would love to hear from you!

Tel: 0207 048 3304

Email: jobs@gkrlondon.com

Web: www.gkrlondon.com